Friday, November 30, 2012

Beef Sukiyaki—With Pictorial


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The very first time I’ve ever tasted a Beef Sukiyaki, it was way back in my Junior High School years when I was still living in Hong Kong.  I attended one of my good friends’ birthday party and her Mom prepared this memorable dish for all of us.  It was the best sukiyaki I’ve ever tasted.  The best, even until now.  I have to say, my own version came pretty closed to hers, but there was something sentimental about the very first time that I had this dish.  It was my very first time attending a friend’s birthday patty without my parents’ present.  That was something huge, at least, it was something huge for me back then.

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Sukiyaki is a Japanese winter dish of soup, or stew, prepared and served in the nabemono (Japanese hot pot) style.  It consists of meat, usually thinly sliced beef, which is slowly cooked at the table, along with other vegetables and ingredients, in a shallow iron pot.  The sukiyaki sauce usually contains a mixture of soy sauce, sugar, and mirin. Before being eaten, the ingredients are usually dipped in a small bowl of raw, beaten eggs. 

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Hot pots” (or Chinese style fondue) are very popular in Asian cuisine, especially in the winter.  They are slightly different than sukiyaki. Instead of having a sauce for the base, Chinese style hot pots use varieties of soup base, usually chicken stock, beef stocks, or herbal soup as it’s base for cooking.  Then, the cooked ingredients are dipped into a bowl of raw beaten eggs with soy sauce (and chili oil if you like it spicy).  I grew up having hot pots every winter with my family.  It’s the best family-style kind of meal.  We gather around the table, mingle, and cook together as we eat, often for hours.  It’s the best way to spend quality time together, in my opinion.  Not to mention, super easy to prepare as well.  All you need to do is to get the the soup base and other ingredients ready.  Then, everyone cook whatever they like to eat at the table-side.    

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Want to join me in the kitchen to see how I prepare the Beef Sukiyaki?  Come on over.

1) Remove the stems of the shitake mushrooms, it’s much easier to do so when the mushrooms are still dry.

2) Rinse and soak in the hottest tab water until soften (about 30 minutes to 1 hour, depending on thickness).

3) Thinly sliced the carrot and cut the preferred shape with a small cookie cutter.

4) Trim off, and discard the roots of the enoki mushrooms, wash, drain and set aside.

Pictorial A

5) This is the package of the Yam noodles that I’ve got.  Very healthy and naturally gluten free.  Very low in calories as well.  I have no idea why they are called yam cakes on the package though.

6) A close look at the yam noodles.  They are rolled up in small bite size bundles.  Cute and convenience.

7) I used some fried soybean curd this time.  You can use firm tofu if you like.

8) Last but not least, I’ve got some wonderful quality of Kobe Beef!  Juicy and tender.  So decadent. 

Pictorial B

9) In a medium nabemono, clay pot, or sauce pan, bring the water, soy sauce, sake, mirin, sugar and sesame oil to a boil. Add the soften shitake mushrooms, cabbage and carrot, cook until almost cooked through, about 15 to 20 minutes.

Then add the Bok Choy, soy bean curd, enoki mushrooms and yam noodles into the pot until the liquid comes up to a boil again. When ready to serve, add the sliced beef into the pot. Remove from heat, sprinkle green onion on top and enjoy. (This part can/should be done at the dining table with a portable stove.)

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My hubby was able to join me for lunch when I prepared this Beef Sukiyaki the other day.  It was warm and wonderful.  We really enjoyed this Beef Sukiyaki.  I hope you’ll give this recipe a try.  Have fun cooking and stay warm.

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Beef Sukiyaki: (Printable Recipe)Servings: 2

4 dried shitake mushrooms
1/4 Napa cabbage, cut into bite size pieces
1/4 carrot, thinly sliced (use a small cookie cutter and cut them into shapes if desired)
1 (5 ounce) package Enoki mushroons, trim off the roots
a small bunch Bok Choy, wash and split in half lengthwise
1/2 cup fried soy bean curd (can use firm tofu instead)
1 (7 ounce) package yam noodles
1/2 pound pre-sliced beef, for sukiyaki/shabu shabu
1 green onion, diced
1 1/2 cups water
1/2 cup soy sauce (more or less, adjust to your own taste)
1/2 cup cooking sake
1/2 cup mirin (Japanese sweet cooking wine)
4 tablespoons sugar
1/4 teaspoon sesame oil

Remove the stems of the shitake mushrooms, rinse and soak in the hottest tab water until soften (about 30 minutes to 1 hour, depending on thickness). 

In a medium nabemono, clay pot, or sauce pan, bring the water, soy sauce, sake, mirin, sugar and sesame oil to a boil.  Add the soften shitake mushrooms, cabbage and carrot, cook until almost cooked through, about 20 minutes. 

Then add the Bok Choy, soy bean curd, enoki mushrooms and yam noodles into the pot until the liquid comes up to a boil again.  When ready to serve, add the sliced beef into the pot.  Remove from heat, sprinkle green onion on top and enjoy. (This part can be done at the dining table with a portable stove.)

33 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thank you, Dear. :) Have a beautiful weekend.

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  2. This looks so warm and comforting! Makes me want hot pot now! Do you know any good hot pot place in LA?

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    1. The Little Sheep is one of my favorite as they have the herbal soup base. http://www.littlesheephotpot.com/chinese-food-restaurants

      For Japanese Shabu Shabu, I usually go here: http://shabushabuhouse.menutoeat.com/

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    2. Thanks, Amy! Whenever I walked pass that shabu shabu place, there is always a long line. I haven't got a chance to try it yet. Now, I really should.

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  3. Shabu shabu restaurants are getting more popular and there are many shabu shabu place in the Bay Area, but we cannot forget sukiyaki!! :D Yours look delicious and I like how you styled your photos. It looks very nice and appetizing!

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    1. Thank you so much. Yeah....I think there are more shabu shabu places here in the LA area as well. But I love the more flavorful soup base of sikiyaki. ;) So lovely to have it on a cold winter night.

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  4. Wow...Amy that looks fantastic and your pictorial is very helpful too.
    Delicious, appealing, healthy and comforting!!! Perfect dish!

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    1. Thank you, Sandra. Glad you like this dish and found the pictorial helpful. :)

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  5. This looks so delicious. Crave worthy! Oh my!

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    1. Thank you, my friend. Glad you like it.

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  6. Those recipes you have are totally awesome! So colorful and looks so delicious! Probably I am gonna make this tomorrow with my friends! Thanks a lot!

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    1. Thank. Glad you like this recipe.

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  7. I love beef sukiyaki too. We got no winter here but always have this hot sukiyaki during the rainy season.

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    1. No winter is okay...as long as you stay cool, you can have a hot pot any time. ;)

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  8. I'm a soup person and this one is one of my favorites. Sharing it with friends or family makes it even better. I can certainly have it here in the US but I miss Japan. Awesome pics...

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    1. Oh yeah...I miss Japan too. The food, the view, the fashion, etc. Just lovely. Hope I can visit Japan again soon. :)

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  9. That looks so tasty. I want more taro cakes please.

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    1. Sure...the taro cakes are my my favorite too.

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  10. i've been seeing sukiyaki around in japanese restaurants, but never tried them, yours look nicer than the restaurant pictures! you are luring me to venture into japanese cuisine now, I always find the cuisine difficult but this time, will try your recipe;-)

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    1. Thank you so much for your kind words. :) This recipe is super easy to put together. :) Hope you like it as much as my family does.

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  11. That would be just the thing for all this wet, dreary weather we've been having. Warms you from the inside out. ;)

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    1. Oh yeah...this is totally perfect on a cold rainy night. :) I gotta get more meat to make it again this weekend.

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  12. I've eaten Beef Sukiyaki loads of times, but have never made it. Great recipe! I love the flavor, and it's a pretty easy dish to prepare. Good post, good pictures - thanks so much.

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    1. Thank you so much for your kind words. Yes, this is a really easy recipe that you can now enjoy anytime at home. :) Thanks for visiting and leaving a comment. Hope you'll be back soon.

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  13. I can't wait to make this! I am so happy you used snake river farms beef. I loved them too!! Thank you for sharing!

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    1. Oh yeah...the SRF beef is so fresh and nicely marbled. Really melt in my mouth kind of meat. :)

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  14. Yours is so well put together---I love all your components and preparation!!! I also found ya on twitter =)

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    1. Thank you so much for your kind words. Appreciate that you follow me on Twitter. :) I'm following you back now.

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  15. Oh Amy, looking at you sukiyaki, I wish I have a bowl like this for my dinner tonight...looks beautiful and delicious.
    Have a wonderful week :)

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    1. Thank you so much. I'm glad you like it. This is so perfect for this weather. I can't wait to make it again too.

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  16. I am such a sucker when it comes sukiyaki because this is one of the dishes I always end up ordering in an authentic japanese restaurant. I absolutely love your pictures. The dish is perfectly presented. Thanks for sharing it!

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  17. Its simple, its delicious and its perfect with rice. I really have to replace beef with chicken or lamb because its a taboo for us. Love the combo of mushroom and infused with the rest of the ingredients.

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